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  PFC James Arthur McCalvy    In memory of our fallen brother

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for he to-day that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother"



Bravo Company
1st Battalion
35th Infantry Regiment

Vietnam War


"Not For Fame or Reward
Not For Place or For Rank
But In Simple Obedience To
Duty as They Understood It"

National Defense Service Medal Vietnam Service Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal



The 35th Infantry Regiment Association salutes our fallen brother, PFC James Arthur McCalvy, who died in the service of his country on November 20th, 1966 in Kontum Province, Vietnam. The cause of death was listed as Misadventure/Friendly Fire. At the time of his death James was 19 years of age. He was from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. James is honored on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Panel 12E, Line 96.

The decorations earned by PFC James Arthur McCalvy include: the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Silver Star, the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm Unit Citation.


(From His Obituary)

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T Mc Calvy said the army told them their son was killed by an exploding American mortar round. PFC Mc Calvy had attended the old Cross Immanuel Lutheran School and Bay View high school. He entered the Army in February and had been in Vietnam three months.

The soldiers father said the family received the last letter from James November 13. His parents had already mailed a radio to him as a Christmas gift. The family includes six other children, Robert Jr., Bruce, Ronald, Deborah, Parry Ann, and Mrs. Barbara Schwartz, Milwaukee.

(His Silver Star Citation)

General Orders 1366, Award of The Silver Star, 4th Infantry Division, 16 June 1967

For gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class McClavy distinguished himself by heroic actions on 20 November 1966, during s search and destroy mission being conducted by B, 1/35th Infantry. On this date Private First Class McClavy was serving as point man and was wounded in the initial moments of a firefight as his unit came under attack from an estimated reinforced North Vietnamese company. Seeing a heavy machine gun on a wheeled mount directly to his squads front, Private First Class McClavy totally disregarded his wounds and began crawling toward the gun, fearlessly exposing himself to the intense enemy fire. When he reached within ten meters of the enemy position, he threw hand grenades which succeeded in eliminating several enemy soldiers. Suddenly an enemy grenade exploded near Private First Class McClavy, mortally wounding him. His vigorous and aggressive assault silenced the machine gun long enough for the rest of the squad to maneuver and gain the tactical advantage. Private First Class McClavys personal courage, fierce determination, and supreme devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.