Back    KIA Index    Search

  SP4 Danny David Rhoads    In memory of our fallen brother

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for he to-day that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother"



Alpha Company
2nd Battalion
35th Infantry Regiment

Vietnam War


"Not For Fame or Reward
Not For Place or For Rank
But In Simple Obedience To
Duty as They Understood It"

National Defense Service Medal Vietnam Service Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal



The 35th Infantry Regiment Association salutes our fallen brother, SP4 Danny David Rhoads, who died in the service of his country on March 12th, 1967 in Kontum Province, Vietnam. The cause of death was listed as Small Arms/AW. At the time of his death Danny was 20 years of age. He was from Lemoore, California. Danny is honored on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Panel 16E, Line 70.

The decorations earned by SP4 Danny David Rhoads include: the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Bronze Star with V, the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm Unit Citation.


From his obituary:

"The Defense Department announced that Spec 4 Danny David Rhoads, a former standout athlete at Lemoore High School, was killed in action in Vietnam Sunday.

Rhoads, 20, is the son of Lloyd Rhoads Jr., 536 Lombardy Lane, and Mrs. Eula Rhoads who lives in Texas. He was born in Hanford and was graduated from Lemoore High in 1965.

Rhoads entered the Army in February 1966 and had been in Vietnam since last October. At Lemoore High he participated in football, basketball, track, and baseball."

Danny is buried in Lemoore Cemetery

(His BSV Citation)

General Orders 860, Award of The Bronze Star for Heroism, 4th Division, 9 May 1967

For heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Rhoads distinguished himself by heroic action on 12 March 1967 while serving with A, 2/35th Infantry during a search and destroy mission. Moving over dense mountains terrain, the company made contact with a multi-battalion size enemy force and was subjected to massive barrages of small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. As the battle wore on, one of the platoons which had suffered heavy casualties sent for help in order to evacuate them. Specialist Four Rhoads, working as Communications Chief, unselfishly volunteered to go as an infantryman to the aid of his stricken comrades. Disregarding his own safety, risking certain danger, he chose to cross 300 meters of open, enemy held territory so that he could help his fallen comrades. Outfitting himself with extra water and ammunition for the other men, he set out for his objective. As he neared the end of the hazardous mission, Specialist Four Rhoads' squad was suddenly placed under intense automatic, mortar, and sniper fire; pinning them down. Specialist Four Rhoads spotted a sniper position and began to maneuver in order to engage the enemy. As he moved, a mortar round fell near him and he was fatally wounded. Inspired by Specialist Four Rhoads’ actions, the remainder of the platoon aggressively maneuvered and reached their objective. Specialist Four Rhoads' display of courage, devotion to duty, and determination are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.