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  PFC Jeffrey Duron McGuire    In memory of our fallen brother

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for he to-day that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother"



Bravo Company
2nd Battalion
35th Infantry Regiment

Vietnam War


"Not For Fame or Reward
Not For Place or For Rank
But In Simple Obedience To
Duty as They Understood It"

National Defense Service Medal Vietnam Service Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal



The 35th Infantry Regiment Association salutes our fallen brother, PFC Jeffrey Duron McGuire, who died in the service of his country on June 24th, 1967 in Quang Ngai Province, Vietnam. The cause of death was listed as Mine. At the time of his death Jeffrey was 19 years of age. He was from Louisville, Kentucky. Jeffrey is honored on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Panel 22E, Line 58.

The decorations earned by PFC Jeffrey Duron McGuire include: the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Bronze Star with V, the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm Unit Citation.


(From His Obituary)

A Louisville solider has been killed in Vietnam by wounds received from an exploding enemy mine.

He is Mr. Jeffrey Duron McGuire, 19, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Burton McGuire. He was a 1965 graduate of Ahrens Trade High School and had been in Vietnam only six weeks.

McGuire entered military service in November of 1966. He was formerly employed by the Edlin Construction Company. He was a member of the Highland Park Christian Church.

Besides his parents, he is survived by: two sisters, Darlene and Daphine McGuire; a brother, Darrell McGuire; and his paternal grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie McGuire of Beattyville.

The body will be at McDaniel Funeral Home, 4339 Park Blvd. Internment will be in Evergreen Cemetery, Louisville.

(His BSV Citation)

General Orders 3323, Award Of The Bronze Star For Heroism, 4th Infantry Division, 8 October 1967

For heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 29 May 1967 Private First Class McGuire distinguished himself while serving as a Radio-Telephone Operator in Company B, 2/35th Infantry, operating near Duc Pho. The company had taken up night positions and Private First Class McGuire's platoon was situated in an ambush site away from the rest of the company. Early in the morning the enemy attacked the company perimeter with mortars and small arms fire, and followed with an assault. His platoon began moving toward the company to provide reinforcements, but, due to the darkness and the overgrown terrain, movement was slow and control was difficult. Private First Class McGuire realized the urgency of the situation, and, acting on his own judgment, he moved forward and joined the point element so that he could keep his platoon leader informed of the situation as it developed. Continuously exposing himself to enemy fire, he pointed out enemy positions and assisted in providing cover fire for the point team. The information that he relayed back to his platoon leader enabled him to plan the final movement in which the platoon broke through to the company. Private First Class McGuir's heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the United States Army.