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  SGT Edward John Wagner Jr.    In memory of our fallen brother

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for he to-day that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother"



Bravo Company
1st Battalion
35th Infantry Regiment

Vietnam War


"Not For Fame or Reward
Not For Place or For Rank
But In Simple Obedience To
Duty as They Understood It"

National Defense Service Medal Vietnam Service Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal



The 35th Infantry Regiment Association salutes our fallen brother, SGT Edward John Wagner Jr., who died in the service of his country on May 19th, 1967 in Quang Ngai Province, Vietnam. The cause of death was listed as Small Arms/AW. At the time of his death Edward was 27 years of age. He was from Everett, Washington. Edward is honored on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Panel 20E, Line 51.

The decorations earned by SGT Edward John Wagner Jr. include: the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Bronze Star with V, the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm Unit Citation.


(His BSV Citation)

General Orders 1772, 4th Division, Award of The Bronze Star for Heroism

For heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 19 March 1967, Sergeant Wagner distinguished himself while serving as a Squad Leader in B,1/35th Infantry as it conducted a search and destroy operation near Duc Pho. As the lead elements of the company entered a small village, they made contact with the enemy and a firefight began. Sergeant Wagner took charge of his squad and began to close with the enemy, maneuvering forward skillfully. Frequently he exposed himself to the enemy as he moved about directing the fire of his men. Their advance was suddenly checked when they came upon two enemy automatic weapons positions whose heavy volume of fire threatened the whole platoon. Taking the initiative, Sergeant Wagner rallied his men and then led them in an assault on the enemy. After personally destroying one of the hostile guns, he was mortally wounded, but his heroic efforts inspired the men around him and enabled them to eliminate the enemy positions. Sergeant Wagner's outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty, and personal bravery are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service; and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.