35th Infantry Regiment (Cacti) Association


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  PV2 William R. Stinnett    In memory of our fallen brother

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for he to-day that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother"



35th Infantry Regiment
Korean War


"Not For Fame or Reward
Not For Place or For Rank
But In Simple Obedience To
Duty as They Understood It"

National Defense Service Medal Korean Service Medal United Nations Korean Service Medal Republic of Korea War Service Medal



The 35th Infantry Regiment Association salutes our fallen brother, PV2 William R. Stinnett, RA14216214, who died in the service of his country on June 24th, 1952 in North Korea. The cause of death was listed as KIA. At the time of his death William was 24 years of age. He was from Maryville, Tennessee. William's Military Occupation Specialty was 3729-Combat Construction Specialist.

The decorations earned by PV2 William R. Stinnett include: the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Korea Service Medal, and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.


Private Stinnett was a member of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in North Korea on June 24, 1952. Private Stinnett was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman's Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

Burial:
Fellowship Baptist Cemetery
Blount County
Tennessee, USA

Thank you so much for honoring my uncle. My dad, Jesse, was his brother. After my dad died in 1974 my mom gave me my uncles flag, and told me she knew I was the one to trust it with. I decided to honor my uncle by donating it to Blount County Veterans. I didn't realize how emotional that would be for me to see him honored by other people.
My Uncle Dubby; I wish I had a color picture so people could see his vibrant red hair and blue eyes. He also had already been to Korea once, and safely made it home. But once back here he felt he wasn't satisfied and joined back up then went right back to Korea. That's what he wanted. His mom, my grandma, begged him not to go. He was killed only days after going back to Korea. He stepped on a land mine. My grandma received a letter from him saying he had arrived and was ok two days after being notified he had been killed. Again, thank you so much for honoring these men. I will never forget.
Sincerely, Linda Stinnett Heatherly