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  SGT Peter James Paele    In memory of our fallen brother

"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; for he to-day that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother"



Alpha Company
1st Battalion
35th Infantry Regiment

Vietnam War


"Not For Fame or Reward
Not For Place or For Rank
But In Simple Obedience To
Duty as They Understood It"

National Defense Service Medal Vietnam Service Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal



The 35th Infantry Regiment Association salutes our fallen brother, SGT Peter James Paele, who died in the service of his country on October 21st, 1967 in Quang Tin Province, Vietnam. The cause of death was listed as Small Arms/AW. At the time of his death Peter was 32 years of age. He was from Kahului, Hawaii. Peter is honored on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Panel 28E, Line 46.

The decorations earned by SGT Peter James Paele include: the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Bronze Star with V, the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm Unit Citation.


Peter is buried in the Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery


(From the “Maui News”, November 1, 1967)

Sergeant Peter J Paele of Maui died in Vietnam as a result of wounds received from hostile fire while on a combat mission, according to the information office, U.S. Army Hawaii.

His next-of-kin is listed as father Edward Paele Jr.; former Pauwela resident now a patient at Kula Sanatorium. He is also survived by his wife, Dorothy L Paele, and stepdaughter, Sally A Addison, both of Platte City, Missouri; as well as a sister, Mrs. Edith Torricer of Maui.

Award of The Bronze Star Medal for Heroism. General Orders Number 3745 4th Infantry Division

For heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 21 October 1967 Sergeant Paele distinguished himself while serving as a Squad Leader in Company A, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry. While on a search and destroy mission near FSB Mary Lou, his platoon began receiving sniper fire and several men were wounded immediately. Moving forward to a position from which he could better engage the enemy; Sergeant Paele began to return the fire, covering the men behind him as they attempted to maneuver. Noting the positions of several of the snipers, Sergeant Paele fired on them, eliminating one and forcing the others to flee. Though in the course of this action he received a wound which later proved to be fatal, he continued to fire until he ran out of ammunition, His decisive actions and personal courage undoubtedly prevented the snipers from inflicting additional casualties on the platoon. Sergeant Paele’s aggressiveness and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the United States Army,